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Glass
Doctor Milton Glass was a physicist and research director at Gila Flats.

Biography Edit

Early Career Edit

Nuclear Physicist Edit

When the Manhattan Project showed how destructive nuclear power could be, Milton Glass developed experiments to demonstrate whether or not atomic power could be controlled in the hopes that it would change the world.[1]

Research Director at Gila Flats Edit

Intrinsic Field Experiments Edit

Glass became the research director at the Gila Flats Research Base. He and his team developed experiments using the intrinsic field chamber, a machine that utilizes radiation to remove intrinsic fields from solid objects.

Meeting Jon Osterman Edit

In 1959 Glass welcomed Jon Osterman to Gila Flats and told Wally Weaver to show him around the base while smoking a Turkish cigarette.[2]

Intrinsic Field Accident Edit

Glass was present when Osterman accidentally locked himself in the Intrinsic field subtractor chamber while the generators were warming up for the afternoon experiment. Terrified, he explained that the time lock on the door can't be overridden.[2] After the accident destroyed Osterman, he attempted to reverse the intrinsic field generators but to no avail. He then announced the news to Osterman's father.[1]

Sponsoring Doctor Manhattan Edit

The American Superman Edit

When Jon Osterman regenerated himself as the super-powered being known as Doctor Manhattan, Glass chose to sponsor him to the public. When he became public, he was pressed by a journalist for a quote, and he said "God exists, and he's American" which was later misquoted and toned down as "Superman exists, and he's American".[3] He was seen photographed outside Gila Flats with Manhattan and other officials. He also was present in Washington, D.C. when Manhattan shook hands with John F. Kennedy.[2]

Dr. Manhattan: Super-Powers and the Superpowers. Edit

Glass began to develop serious concerns over the existence of Doctor Manhattan. His misgivings of this godlike being led him to write Dr. Manhattan: Super-Powers and the Superpowers. Glass was skeptical of whether Manhattan could actually be used as a super weapon by the United States against the Soviet Union; in his essay he noted that the arms race had intensified, and when cornered, the Soviets would resolve to Mutually Assured Destruction. He also knew that Manhattan would be unable to destroy all the warheads coming from Russia; those left out would be enough to annihilate life in the northern hemisphere.[3]

TriviaEdit

References

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